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                                                                 Packer's fame, Leroy Butler

           

   

   

   

   
                                                        Packer's fame, Leroy Butler

 

   

   Pope Francis ("Papa Francisco")

      

              Pope Francis spoke at the United Nations General Assembly September 25, 2015.

     

                                  Below are three selected quotes from his speech.  
 

     Pope Francis continues to show his concern for the environment...   

   "Any harm done to the environment, therefore, is harm done to humanity."




     'Right to Life' is not limited to the unborn...


"The common home of all men and women must continue to rise on the foundations of a right understanding of universal fraternity and respect for the sacredness of every human life, of every man and every woman, the poor, the elderly, children, the infirm, the unborn, the unemployed, the abandoned, those considered disposable because they are only considered as part of a statistic."





    The Culture of Waste...

 "The poorest are those who suffer most from such offenses, for three serious reasons: they are cast off by society, forced to live off what is discarded and suffer unjustly from the abuse of the environment. They are part of today's widespread and quietly growing 'culture of waste.'"
  



   The entire speech may be read at...

   http://time.com/4049905/pope-francis-us-visit-united-nations-speech-transcript/



                                                                           End                                                      9-28-15



   2015 Walworth County Fair
                              (a pictorial)

  
     
Showing horses and equestrian competition is always part of the fair.
  

  
    Beside horses, the rodeo included bull riding.  Very dangerous.

 
           Packer's fame, Leroy Butler came Saturday for photos and autographs.
 
 


 
 
                                          The Marvelous Mutts put on daily shows.

 
     The Demo Derby provided many thrills.                     Some cars driven by the ladies.
 
                                        Plenty of excitement but, no injuries.

                                                                   End                                                      9-9-15
          2015 Walworth County Fair

  As always, the Fair offers something for everyone.  Including...

     

  Free taxi service for disabled and seniors.                   Talent shows.



   
        (Image courtesy of Green Bay Packers & Walworth Fair)

Meet Leroy Butler Sat. September 5 between 11 & 3              Excitement!!



    

                 Critters                                                      and more critters.


The fair will run from Wednesday, September 2 thru Monday, September 2, 2015.  
The Grand Stand events will include...

Barrels N Bulls Wed, Sept 2 @ 7PM

Truck N Tractor pulls Thursday, Sept 3 @ 11Am & 3PM

Monster Trucks Friday, Sept 4 @ 7:30 PM

Charlie Daniels Band Sat, Sept 5 @ 7:30 PM

Cheap Trick Sunday, Sept 6 @ 7:30 PM

Demo Derby Monday, Sept 7 @ 1:30 PM, 4:PM & 6:30 PM



                                                                End    
                                       8-3-15
                                                               ****

The following is a news release received from the U.S. Department of Education

Office of Communications & Outreach, Press Office, 
400 Maryland Ave., S.W.Washington, D.C. 20202   FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEApril 7, 2015 CONTACT:Press Office, (202) 401-1576 or  press@ed.gov

 

 

New Report Shows Greater Need for Access to High-Quality Preschool for Wisconsin’s Children

Data highlights the nation’s unmet need for high-quality early learning

 

The U.S. Department of Education released a new report today detailing the unmet need across the country for high-quality preschool programs.

According to the report, A Matter of Equity: Preschool in America, of the approximately 4 million 4-year olds in the Unites States, about 60 percent – or nearly 2.5 million - are not enrolled in publicly funded preschool programs, including state preschool programs, Head Start and programs serving children with disabilities. Even fewer are enrolled in the highest-quality programs. In Wisconsin 28 percent of 4-year-olds are not enrolled.

The report highlights the need for an Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) that expands access to high-quality early learning opportunities and makes the law preschool through 12th grade, rather than K-12. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan discussed the report today during a visit to Martin Luther King Jr. Early Childhood Center in Phoenix, Arizona.

“This new report shows that we are a long way from achieving full educational opportunity in this country. Students have made enormous progress in recent years, thanks to the hard work of educators, families and the students themselves, but we have so much farther to go, and making high-quality preschool available to all families who want it must be part of that,” Duncan said. “We’ve made key investments in early learning, but we need to do more. Expanding access to high-quality preschool within the reauthorization of ESEA will narrow achievement gaps, and reflect the real, scientific understanding that learning begins long before a child enters kindergarten.”

Advances in science and research have proven the important impact that preschool programs can have on children’s learning, but unfortunately too many children still do not have access to these programs. Latinos are the United States’ fastest growing and largest minority group, making up a quarter of 3- and 4-year-olds, yet they have the lowest preschool participation rates of any major ethnicity or race – 40 percent as compared to 50 percent for African-American children, and 53 percent for white children. In addition, children from low-income families are less likely to be enrolled in preschool than their peers – 41 percent compared to 61 percent.

African-American children and children from low-income families are the most likely to be in low-quality settings and the least likely to be in high-quality settings. All children need access to high-quality preschool to prepare them for kindergarten and to close the opportunity and achievement gaps

For some children when they enter kindergarten, huge educational gaps exists. White students have higher reading and math scores than students of color. Scores on reading and math were lowest for kindergartners in households with incomes below the federal poverty level and highest for those in households with incomes at or above 200 percent of the federal poverty level. Children at risk for academic failure, on average, start kindergarten 12 to 14 months behind their peers in pre-literacy and language skills.  Without access to quality preschool, students of color, and children from low-income families, are far less likely to be prepared to start kindergarten than their peers. 

High-quality preschool provides benefits to society of $8.60 for every $1 spent, according to the White House Council of Economic Advisors December 2014 report, The Economics of Early Childhood Investments, about half of which comes from increased earnings for children when they grow up.  An impressive coalition of education, business, law enforcement, retired military, child advocacy groups, and faith-based leaders and 70 percent of voters said in a recent Gallup poll that they would support increasing federal funding to make sure high-quality preschool programs are available for every child in America.

The Obama Administration has made significant investments in early learning through the Early Learning Challenge and the Preschool Development Grants programs. The grants lay the groundwork for states to be prepared for the proposed Preschool for All program. The Administration has asked for an increase of $500 million for Preschool Development Grants in the FY16 budget request to expand this opportunity to more states, the Bureau of Indian Education, tribal educational agencies, territories, and the outlying areas.

Preschool Development Grants support states’ efforts to build or enhance their infrastructure to provide high-quality preschool programs, and expand programs in high-need communities. The $250 million awarded to 18 states will benefit more than 33,000 additional children in 200 high-need communities, where families have little or no access to affordable, high-quality preschool.  With additional funding, the Department could have provided high-quality opportunities for many more children in the 36 states that applied.

Access to Preschool Uneven Across States

Table 1. Enrollment in Publicly Funded Preschool1 by State (4-year-olds) 2012–2013[i]

 

State

Total  number of 4-year-olds in the state

Percentage of 4-year olds enrolled in state preschool

Percentage of 4-year olds enrolled in federal Head Start programs

Percentage of 4-year-olds enrolled in special education preschool services

Total 4-year-olds not enrolled in a publicly funded program

Total percentage of 4-year-olds not enrolled in a publicly funded program

50 states plus D.C.

4,112,347

28%

10%

3%

2,462,740

59%

Alabama

    62,483

6%

15%

2%

48,145

77%

Alaska

    10,760

3%

13%

6%

8,420

78%

Arizona

    92,778

3%

11%

5%

75,118

81%

Arkansas

   40,173

33%

13%

5%

19,862

49%

California

  516,595

15%

11%

3%

368,341

71%

Colorado

    69,956

21%

7%

6%

46,103

66%

Connecticut

    40,958

13%

7%

5%

30,343

74%

Delaware

    11,372

7%

6%

6%

9,223

81%

District of Columbia

6,945

94%

6%

0%

0

0%

Florida

  221,842

78%

9%

1%

25,266

11%

Georgia

  140,894

58%

7%

1%

47,981

34%

Hawaii

    17,536

0%

9%

4%

15,176

87%

Idaho

    24,427

0%

8%

4%

21,298

87%

Illinois

  167,665

27%

11%

3%

98,124

59%

Indiana

    87,734

0%

9%

6%

75,006

85%

Iowa

    41,034

60%

8%

2%

12,159

30%

Kansas

    41,428

21%

8%

8%

26,440

64%

Kentucky

    57,379

29%

15%

0%

31,945

56%

Louisiana

    64,356

31%

12%

2%

35,050

54%

Maine

    14,059

34%

10%

7%

6,775

48%

Maryland

    74,758

35%

6%

5%

38,679

52%

Massachusetts

    74,901

14%

7%

4%

55,932

75%

Michigan

  119,525

21%

15%

0%

77,066

64%

Minnesota

    72,464

1%

8%

6%

61,430

85%

Mississippi

    43,363

0%

33%

4%

27,339

63%

Missouri

    78,544

3%

10%

6%

63,586

81%

Montana

    12,568

0%

19%

3%

9,833

78%

Nebraska

    26,783

26%

9%

0%

17,527

65%

Nevada

    38,407

3%

4%

7%

33,065

86%

New Hampshire

    13,853

0%

5%

7%

12,144

88%

New Jersey

  109,605

28%

6%

5%

65,952

60%

New Mexico

    29,614

18%

14%

7%

18,036

61%

New York

  231,040

45%

10%

6%

91,147

39%

North Carolina

  128,958

23%

9%

3%

84,809

66%

North Dakota

     9,256

0%

17%

5%

7,183

78%

Ohio

  144,309

2%

12%

5%

116,712

81%

Oklahoma

    54,100

74%

13%

0%

6,955

13%

Oregon

    48,463

10%

8%

5%

37,307

77%

Pennsylvania

  147,710

12%

10%

6%

105,705

72%

Rhode Island

    11,607

1%

10%

7%

9,455

81%

South Carolina

    61,682

40%

9%

2%

30,261

49%

South Dakota

    12,237

0%

18%

6%

9,295

76%

Tennessee

    84,178

21%

11%

2%

55,086

65%

Texas

  397,272

52%

9%

1%

152,559

38%

Utah

    53,014

0%

7%

6%

46,130

87%

Vermont

     6,462

71%

8%

0%

1,320

20%

Virginia

  104,722

17%

7%

3%

76,900

73%

Washington

    90,419

8%

8%

4%

72,255

80%

West Virginia

    21,469

62%

23%

0%

3,165

15%

Wisconsin

    72,488

64%

7%

1%

19,968

28%

Wyoming

     8,202

0%

11%

13%

6,216

76%

Source: National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER). (2013). 2013 State Preschool Yearbook

1 Publicly-funded preschool includes state preschool, Head Start, and special education preschool services and does not include privately funded or locally funded preschool programs.

                                                                       End       4-8-15
                                                                      ****

Thursday, February 19, 2015

       Whitewater students protested the             proposed budget cuts to the Wisconsin                University System.

     
   
   Dispite the bitter cold, students and faculty gathered to show their concern for the proposed budget cuts to the Wisconsin University system.  

    

  They came together at the University Center on the campus and then marched to Hyland Hall where they heard from local dignitaries. 


   

  Councilmember Stephanie Abbott stated that although she was a Republican, she could not condone the heavy cuts to the UW.  She added that she felt that the Campus was neither Democrat or Republican.

     

   Professor James Hartwick spoke of the harm to the Whitewater system because of the potential for a "brain drain."  He added that a mathematics instructor has already backed out of an interview and is going elsewhere.  He also added that while the UW system makes up only 8% of the State budget, it will be forced to make
   up 33% of the shortfall.


    

  State Representative Andy Jorgensen told us that the Whitewater UW is being dealt the largest cut of all the colleges in the State, 19%.

  "A few months ago Walker said we had a surplus.  Where did it go?" asked Jorgensen.

  "Tell your Representative, I'll be watching you... to see what you will do."

  "This is a moment in time," he concluded, "when our government has gone too far."

  (Readers may recall that we polled 6 Representatives [last week] regarding their intentions.  None responded.  We have polled 6 more and asked for their by reply Wednesday.)


                                                            End                   2-20-15
                                                           ****
  Medal of Valor ceremony for two Wisconsin 
                        police officers

At 10:45 AM ET today, Lt. Brian Murphy and Officer Savan Lenda of Oak Creek, Wisconsin, were awarded the Medal of Valor by Vice President Biden and Attorney General Holder.

  Below are details taken from press releases from the White House...

      THE PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICER MEDAL OF VALOR:

The Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor, authorized by the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Act of 2001, is the highest national award for valor presented to a public safety officer. The medal is awarded to public safety officers who have exhibited exceptional courage, regardless of personal safety, in the attempt to save or protect human life. Including today’s awardees, a total of 95 medals have been presented since the first recipients were honored in 2003.

The Medal of Valor is awarded by the President of the United States, or his designee, to public safety officers cited by the Attorney General. Public safety officers are nominated by the chiefs or directors of their employing agencies and recommended by the Medal of Valor Review Board. The Attorney General has designated the U.S. Department of Justice’s department’s Office of Justice Programs (OJP) to serve as the federal point of contact for the Public Safety Medal of Valor.

2012-2013 Medal of Valor Recipients

Lt. Brian Murphy

Officer Savan Lenda

Oak Creek Police Department, Wisconsin

Lt. Murphy and Officer Lenda receive the award for their valiant and selfless efforts during a shooting at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin Aug. 15, 2012. Responding to numerous calls regarding a disturbance at the Temple, Lt. Murphy first saw two fatally injured victims, and the suspect running out of the Temple. When Lt. Murphy drew his weapon, the suspect fired at him, hitting him in the throat, hand and legs. When Officer Lenda arrived he began shooting, striking and partially disabling the suspect, who then crawled out of sight.  Shortly thereafter they heard a single shot as the suspect took his own life.

Unaware of whether there were additional suspects, Officer Lenda drove to the location of the shot and determined that the suspect was dead.  He sent the other officers to Lt. Murphy, who, though wounded, waved them off and directed them to assist those in the Temple.

After the initial shooting, it was later found that the suspect had entered the Sikh Temple and fired at least six rounds in the pantry area where many women and children were hiding.  He then fled the building when Lt. Murphy arrived on the scene.  The entire situation from the time of the first call until Officer Lenda incapacitated the suspect was approximately six minutes. The selfless actions of both Lt. Murphy and Officer Lenda prevented further injury and helped save many lives.

                                                           End     Feb 11, 2015
                                                          ****


          Coming... Wednesday, August 27 thru Monday, September 1

            Walworth County Fair


Wed, Aug 27th features $4 admission for Seniors (over 62) & $25 wristband for rides.



                With Animals                                               and Horses

   
              and a Demo Derby                               and Riding Competitions



             and More animals                   Transportation for Disabled & Seniors


          And more animals                    Entertainment & much, much more.



End   -    August 7, 2014




   Remembering Memorial Day...

   Remembering Our Warriors...




I saw these two great men as I covered the President Obama speech in Bascom hill in Madison, Wisconsin in the fall of 2012.  The President's stand is to the left of this picture, about 50' from these gentlemen.

When Korea was happening, I was just learning to ride a bicycle. 

Although, I suspect that this Marine may have seem action earlier than that, possibly WWII in the South Pacific.  If that was the case, he would likely have seen half of his friends killed or mutilated.  Such memories never leave a person.  

To understand this it becomes necessary to speak in graphic terms since many of us wouldn't understand the horrible things that those eyes would have witnessed.  When you look to the side and suddenly see that half of your best buddy's head is missing, you never forget and fifty or sixty years later, you can still recite their precise names and where they died. 

This is war.

               --------------------------------------------------------

When I was a child, growing up in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, Memorial Day meant a day off of school and a parade with military vehicles, and guns and bands. 

I had a terrific time.  After the parade went past, I'd race on my bike to the cemetery where I'd watch them fire their rifles and lay wreaths and play Taps. 

But, I also saw curious things such as grown men crying or acting terribly somber.  It meant nothing to me as a child.

I left Oconomowoc in the mid sixties and rarely returned until 2007 when I felt the need to go back for Memorial Day.  I watched the parade and it hadn't changed in fifty years with only a few




exceptions.  The most notable exception was that now the old men were people I'd gone to High School with. 
Now I was one of the old people.




Although, some of those that I known had already passed on in recent years. 




Some people I'd known had come back from Vietnam but not recovered. 






And... Yes, some hadn't made it back.





Maybe this is where tradition needs to continue.  Maybe, we owe this to those brave warriors who gave so much to maintain our freedom.





About the only thing that had changed in this ceremony was that some of the rifles had become Vietnam vintage.





I recognized some of the names and faces participating in the ceremony.





These were faces in the crowd that I'd known those 40 & 50 years back.  But it kept coming to me that now we were the old guys.   I saw the same somber expressions that I'd seen in this very cemetery as a child, except that now I understood what those expressions meant.

Lest we as Americans ever forget...

In memory of those I knew who didn't come back...

In memory of all those gave so much...


End                      May 23, 2014                                       John Stoesser


 NORTHWESTERN FOOTBALL PLAYERS                    CAN UNIONIZE


According to ESPN, the National Labor relations board ruled today that Northwestern football players qualify as employees of the university and can unionize.

 

Northwestern issued a statement shortly after the ruling saying it would appeal to the full NLRB in Washington, D.C.

 

In its endeavor to have college football players be recognized as essential workers, CAPA likened scholarships to employment pay.


Click here to see the full ruling in PDF form.


         THE LAST SANDHILL

(Little Guy - His left wing hanging down.)

Throughout the summer, my wife and I have been watching a pair of Sandhill cranes come down to the edge of a bay on the Walworth County Lake that we live on.

As the summer passed and whenever the area was quiet, they’d come down to drink and hunt for food.  When their chick was born, they brought the “Little Guy” along also.

We watched Little Guy grow through the summer.  We watched him/her harass his parents and playfully go off on excursions just as we all did when we were teenagers and knew too much. 

But, about a month and a half ago as the leaves began to turn and Little Guy had begun to join his parents in short flights around the area, a heavy storm hit.  We didn’t see our crane family for a week.  When they did come to the water again, we noticed that Little Guy was carrying his left wing differently.  As time passed we saw him stretch his wings mimicking his parents.  However, we didn’t see him fly again.


Little Guy's wing can be seen hanging down.

Two weeks ago, a neighbor came to our door asking for help.  She knew that we had been involved in a number of animal rescues and had worked with the Wisconsin DNR several times in the past.  She’d also noticed the distended wing and feared that he couldn’t fly.  She speculated that the parents were hanging around waiting for little guy to regain his flight. 

I promised to watch closer.

A week later, we saw Little Guy, but no parents.   He seemed to be lost without their company.  After a couple more days, I decided to investigate the possibility of a rescue and called around the state to the known shelters. 

I learned that it is quite common to young birds (including cranes) to suffer broken bone injuries to their wings.  If they were lucky enough to heal properly, it was likely that they could join their parents on their journey south.  However, if the break healed poorly, they might not be able to make it and this was, also, all too common.

Two of the biologists that I spoke to tried to gently point out to me that the wing issue could be fatal for Little Guy and that the time might come when we would all have to simply “let go.”  Sandhill cranes cannot survive the harshest part or our Wisconsin winters. 

However, I persisted with my calls and learned the basics of capturing a crane.  I learned that, yet, another neighbor had been calling around the State also.  The neighbor had witnessed Little Guy and his parents a few days earlier.  They were trying to get Little Guy to fly with them.  In a nearby field, the neighbor had seen the parents hover around 30 feet over the head of Little Guy and call to him.  He was able to get 10 feet off the ground but couldn’t make it higher.  This was on a Friday, the week before Thanksgiving.  The following day, Saturday, the neighbor thought he saw the parents fly away and hadn’t seen them since. 

 I decided that it was time to take action.  The weather was turning colder and we’d reached the point where we’d have to act or “let go.”  I made a last ditch effort to find a shelter that was willing to care for an injured crane on a permanent basis.   The local shelters had all admitted that they couldn’t maintain a crane over the long run and that if he couldn’t be repaired, he’d have to be put down. 

I went back to my wife on the Monday morning before Thanksgiving and announced that I couldn’t find a good shelter.  We agreed that we had to let go.  It was a very bitter pill to take.  I found myself looking out the window to the area where he had frequented and feeling so damn frustrated.

Two hours later, I got a call from the last shelter that I had tried but hadn't reached.  They were equipped to care for cranes.  They placed such birds in the pen with their rescued deer throughout the summer and then brought the birds inside through the harsh winter months.  They agreed to accept the bird and had no intentions of putting it down.

I contacted the neighbors.  All were in agreement.  We’d make an effort to capture Little Guy right after Thanksgiving.  This gave me time to prepare a transport box and plan for my trim to northern Wisconsin.  That night, Tuesday night, we had a hard freeze.  The next day, Wednesday, Little Guy didn’t appear, nor on Thanksgiving and not sense.

We tried to speculate what could have happened to him.  Had he frozen to death Tuesday night?  It didn’t make sense.  He was still too healthy.

Had a predator gotten to him?  Again, it didn’t seem that likely.  Little guy had 10 feet of flight and was still in good health.

The more likely scenario was that he had been prompted by the cold to move on within the limitations of his abilities.  But, this put him outside of our sphere of influence forcing us to, again, let go. 

 



And that was it.  It had ended.  Not with a bang.  Not with anything.  It was just over.

That is until today… Thursday, December 5, 2013.  In the past few days, we’d had another warm spell.  In fact, last night, Wednesday, Dec 4, I took my grandson to see the Santa Train in Milwaukee and it was 52 degrees out.  But today, the temperature was dropping rapidly.  I went outside to finish the last of my winter preparations and I heard them.  The tittering and croaking of a flock of Sandhills.  I didn’t see them.  But, I didn’t have to.

It makes more sense that Little Guy may have found a group of Sandhills somewhere and hung with them.  I can only hope this is the case and that he had the strength to join them in their flight south. 

At least, that’s what I have to believe....

 
End

 

 

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